How Sour Candy Affects Your Teeth

May 29, 2013

Filed under: Blog — puredental @ 10:56 am

WHY ARE CERTAIN CANDIES so bad for our teeth? One reason is all that sugar, of course. We know that. Here’s something you may not think about as often… Many popular treats include the descriptors tart, tangy, and sour. It seems the more bitter, the better.

Trouble is, our teeth are paying the price for this sour trend and we continue to see the damage.

Acid Erodes Our Teeth

A pH scale shows where substances are on a spectrum from base to acidic. 14–12 is really base, and 2–0 is really acidic.

A nice, neutral pH level of 7 is ideal for your mouth. When you eat acidic foods the pH level lowers. This can create a hostile, enamel-eroding environment for your teeth. No sugar (or plaque) is necessarily needed for an “acid attack” to be damaging.

Let’s Break It Down

Our tooth enamel can start to erode at a pH level of 4. Spree, a relatively mild sour candy, has a pH level of 3, Sour Skittles 2.2, and WarHeads Spray 1.6. That’s pretty shocking when you consider battery acid has a pH level of 1.0.

The Sad Signs Of Erosion

The acid in sour candy can really take a toll on our teeth and may even cause:

  • Sensitivity
  • Translucence at the biting edge of your teeth
  • Increased cavities due to weakened enamel

Find Out How Acidic Your Food Is Using A Cabbage Test!

Be Smart

Chewing sugarless gum stimulates saliva flow for cleansing. Swishing water around in your mouth can also help. Still, the smartest thing you can do is to stop eating tart candies, or eat them very sparingly. They’re treats, not snacks.
If you’re experiencing signs of acid erosion, ask us about it. We can help.

Thanks for being our valued patient! We hope you and your smile are doing well!

Regular Exercise Can Protect And Strengthen Your Smile

May 22, 2013

Filed under: Blog — puredental @ 12:35 pm

WE ALL KNOW THAT EXERCISE IS GOOD FOR US. It promotes wellness, prevents sickness, and is said to benefit body, mind, and soul. But did you know that regular exercise is also good for your oral health? Read on…
Exercise Can Reduce Gum Disease Risk

Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums caused by harmful bacteria in our mouths. Regular exercise can reduce inflammation in your body and mouth—which in turn can lower your risk of gum disease. In a Journal of Periodontology study researchers found that individuals who work out regularly and maintain a healthy weight are 40% less likely to develop gum disease.
Because some studies have linked gum disease to cardiovascular disease and diabetes, eating healthy and staying active can also help protect you from more serious conditions.

Exercise Can Strengthen And Protect Your Smile

Working out helps improve digestion and can help your body more effectively use vitamins and minerals that are essential to dental health. If you exercise and eat healthy, your body is better able to use the nutrients in food to strengthen and protect your smile.
Physical fitness can greatly contribute to dental health. It can also improve your mood, help you manage stress and increase brainpower. If you’re not already, we encourage you to make exercising a habit.

Eating Tips For Before And After Exercise

3 Tips On How To Make Exercise A Habit

  • Do activities you enjoy. You’ll stick with it if it’s something you want to do.
  • Commit to another person. Work out with someone else. If that’s not possible, report your own efforts to someone who cares about you.
  • Reward yourself. Changing behavior is hard. Give yourself a (healthy) incentive.

Have any exercising tips to add? We’d love to see them. Share them with us on Facebook or in the comments below.

Thank you for letting us be a part of your healthy goals!

The Relationship Between Asthma And Cavities

May 17, 2013

Filed under: Blog — puredental @ 1:36 pm

ARE YOU A LITTLE SURPRISED by the headline of this blog post? If so, you’re not alone. Many people are unaware of the link between asthma and tooth decay resulting from dry mouth.

What Does Asthma Have To Do With Cavities?

When drawing one’s breath doesn’t come easily, most people compensate by breathing through their mouths. In turn, breathing through your mouth causes your mouth to dry out. When there’s insufficient saliva to protect and clean your teeth, you’re left more vulnerable to decay-causing bacteria. In addition, some people compound the problem by sipping on sugary drinks all day trying to quench the dryness!
As if that weren’t enough, asthma and allergy medications themselves can cause even more dryness on top of the mouth breathing. Not a good combination.

Some Evidence—But It’s Not Just About Kids

A Swedish study of children and young adults with similar backgrounds and habits evaluated the links between asthma and caries. Within the group with asthma, 19 out of 20 kids developed tooth decay. In the group of asthma-free kids 7 out of 20 developed tooth decay.
Although the study above centered around kids with asthma, the risks are equally applicable to adults as shown in the video report below:

What You Can Do About It

Asthma may not have a simple fix, but tooth decay does. First and foremost, stick faithfully to the basics. Brush at least twice a day and floss to clean the places in your mouth where brushing misses. Keep your scheduled dental cleaning and checkup appointments. Avoid foods and drinks that are most harmful to your teeth.
And specific to this issue, here are some tips for increased, healthy saliva flow:

  • Consider chewing sugarless gum.
  • Consider occasionally sucking on sugarless mints.
  • Be sure to drink water regularly.

One More Special Note About Asthma

If you have asthma, or if someone in your care has asthma, please let our team know! The more we know about your health the better. It helps us advise and serve you better. If you have any questions about how asthma can impact your oral health, please ask us! We’re honored to be your resource.

Thanks for being a fantastic part of our practice! We appreciate having you as our patient.

Smiles And The Science Of Attraction

May 8, 2013

Filed under: Blog — puredental @ 1:37 pm

IT’S PROBABLY NEVER OCCURRED TO YOU to look to your dentist for dating advice. But think about it this way: our business is smiles—and smiles have a surprising amount to do with attraction!

It’s Not So Much About Makeup And Primping

Women in many countries annually spend up to $8 billion on makeup. And, the average woman in those countries spends 20 minutes a day (or more) applying it. But according to a Wrigley Gum study where participants looked at thousands of photos of women smiling with makeup, smiling without makeup, not smiling with makeup, and not smiling without makeup, the study found that both men AND women think that a smile makes a person more attractive than makeup does (and it may save a woman 20 minutes a day)!

Smiles Literally Draw People Closer

Why are smiles so attractive to us? A smile is a “social cue”. It can signal apology, welcome, gratitude, or celebration. A smile means “you’re clear to approach” and we all react to it subconsciously.

Your Smile Ranks #1 In How You’re Initially Judged

Sometimes it’s unwise to judge a book by its cover, but the importance of a first impression is undeniable. A recent survey of over 5,000 singles found that both men (58%) and women (71%) judge the opposite sex MOST on their teeth.
Professional Teeth Cleaning Bloomingdale, West Loop, Chicago
Unfortunately, this is rough news for the 30% of people who are unhappy with their smiles. If you’re one of them, please contact us to visit about things you can do to be more confident about your smile, whether you’re ready for something big or just looking for a small, subtle improvement.

Thanks for your trust in our practice! We appreciate you!

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